Project Four – Roman Blind

Project Four – Roman Blind

 

I must start this post with an apology for the delay, I have been having some technology related issues (laptops who’d have em’???) but now I have finally been able to finish my post…Enjoy!

I wanted to do something to the Kitchen to brighten it up a bit before we decided what to do with cupboards and work tops.  After some thought I decided to add a Roman Blind, the window is quite big so it worked out cheaper to make one rather than buy one; plus I love creating hand made items for our home!

A couple of years ago for Christmas J bought me The Liberty Book of Home Sewing, which has a step-by-step guide to making a less formal unlined Roman Blind.

Book
Not just a pretty cover.

In the Kitchen I have a farmyard animal ornament on the windowsill that I wanted to keep so I chose my fabric with this in mind, after all I am a country girl at heart! I bought Natural Farmyard fabric from Dunelm at £8.99 per metre. I measured up and needed 1.5m for the window, this is worked out by the width of the window plus 15cms for overlap and side hems multiplied by the drop of the window plus 10cms to cover the wooden batten and another 10cms for the lath casing (if the blind is to go outside the window recess then add another 10cms for this).

Fabric
Beautiful Farmyard Cotton Fabric

I made a list of everything I needed and checked online to see where was best to locally purchase them, luckily B & Q and Dunelm had it covered.

Equiptment 2Equiptment

Items needed are:

  • Fabric of choice (thick fabric is good as this blind does not require a lining)
  • Matching sewing thread
  • Sewing kit or machine (I went with my machine to get good hem lines)
  • 3cm square wooden batten (same width as blind)
  • Staple gun and staples
  • Thin 3cm wide wooden lath (3cms shorter than blind width
  • Small Blind rings
  • Four small screw eyes
  • Fine nylon blind cord (eight times the length of the blind)
  • Blind acorn pull
  • Large wall screws, wall anchor plugs and 3cm brackets to fix wooden batten to wall
  • Metal Cleat (to wrap blind cord around when blind is up)

Once I had everything I could begin construction, I was a little nervous I have to say as I’ve never made anything like this before!!

Let the sewing commence.
Let the sewing commence.

I triple checked my measurements (I didn’t want to fall at the first hurdle), pinned the fabric and headed to my sewing machine to hem the sides and create the casing at the bottom of the blind for the wooden lath to be fed into. I didn’t worry about hemming the top of the fabric as this would be hidden and attached to the back of the batten.

Attaching the baton to the fabric.
Attaching the batten to the fabric.

After feeding the lath in and laying the blind out I could see it was starting to take shape and I was starting to relax with it, I had a celebratory cup of tea before moving on to the next step.

I was now ready to measure out the ring positions on the blind, this was another part I triple checked as these had to be right for the blind to fold properly. The closer the rings are to each other the smaller pleats you will get. I chose to place the rings roughly 15cms apart for each of my three columns; one in the centre of the blind and two roughly 10cm in from the sides of the blind.

Measuring the ring spacing.
Measuring the ring spacing.

Once I was happy with my marking and checked they were all level I added the screw eyes to the batten, three to the underside of the batten inline with the cord rings and the forth 2cm from the end of the side where the blind will be raised.

Adding the screw eyes for the cords.
Adding the screw eyes for the cords.

All that was left to do was to carefully sew the cord rings into place where I had marked (You can use blind tape for this but as I was using a cotton that perfectly matched my fabric I was happy to sew directly).

Stitching.
Stitching.

Once all the rings were stitched into place (this took a while as they were clear and I kept misplacing them!) I was at the stage where I could thread the cord.  I tied the cord securely to the bottom ring on the side where the cord will be pulled, threading the cord through the rest of the rings in that column; through the screw eyes and cut it 20cm below the hem. I then repeated this on the second and third column in the same way.  Once all were threaded I cut the cords so they hung to the same length and passed them through the acorn-pull and knotted them loosely.

Ready to hang.
Ready to hang.

I held the blind up and gently pulled on the cord to check the pleats, its safe to say I was a little bit excited when it worked!!! Next I secured the wall brackets in place into the window frame and screwed the blind to it.

Hung in place.
Hung in place.

Once the blind was in its final home I attached the metal cleat to the wall and all that was left to do was pull the cord and see my work in its full glory…

It works!
It works!
Oooh the pleats!
Oooh the pleats!

Its safe to say I am one proud Roman Blind maker, for a first attempt it definitely isn’t too shabby and it goes so well with my ornament!!

I’ll be back soon with my next project, thanks for reading!

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